Justice Everywhere

a blog about justice in public affairs

Category: Academia (Page 2 of 4)

CEU update/ application news

Last April the Hungarian parliament approved a new law that regulates the operations of foreign (non-EEA) universities in Hungary. Among other things, the new law requires a bilateral agreement between Hungary and the country of the university’s origin, and they should also deliver education programs in the countries where they are accredited. Although ‘lex CEU’, as has been popularly referred to, was defended on purely administrative grounds it clearly is part of an orchestrated attack on free institutions—NGOs, independent media, and the judiciary. At the time, it seemed impossible for CEU to fulfil these conditions: deadlines were tight, the costs were enormous since CEU has no educational activity in the US where it is accredited, and securing a bilateral treaty with the US government was unfeasible since, American educational matters are regulated at State level rather than at the federal’s level.

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Recent Vacancies in Political Theory/Philosophy/Ethics

Associate Professorship of Political Theory, University of Oxford (closing 7/12/17)

Assistant Professor in Political Theory, Carleton University (closing 1/12/17)

Lecturer in Philosophy (30 months fixed term), University of Birmingham (closing 29/11/17)

Tenure-track position in Business Ethics, KU Leuven (closing 31/01/18)

Doctoral Scholarships (open to political theory/philosophy/ethics applicants), Central European University (closing 01/02/18)

Climate Justice in Global Perspective

I recently wrote a review for an introductory philosophy text on climate justice. I thought it was a good book. The only criticism of it that I raised felt somewhat unfair, and hypocritical, since it is really a criticism that applies to the book’s field rather than the book itself – and to myself as somebody who works within this field. Namely, that discussions of climate justice in analytic philosophy (of the kind that I was schooled in, at least) have a tendency to be problematically insular, or even exclusionary. My worry is that a lot of the literature I read on climate justice is written by people like me, and (implicitly or explicitly) addressed to people like me. Roughly speaking: academics working in the tradition of analytic ethics and political philosophy; writing in English; located in Europe, North America, or Australia; and relatively privileged in terms of their resources, opportunities for consumption, and low vulnerability to climate change.

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Recent Vacancies in Political Theory/Philosophy/Ethics

Stanford Center for Ethics in Society Post-Doctoral Fellowships

Professor in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, University of Warwick

Lecturer in Politics (open to political theory applicants), University of York

Department Lecturer in Political Theory, University of Oxford

Departmental Lecturer in Ethics, University of Oxford

Political Theory Podcasts

Political theory hasn’t been neglected by the podcast boom, but it’s not always easy to know where to go. Here, I list (with links) the best political theory/philosophy related content in the podverse. (There are also some iTunes U courses and related suggestions below).

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Recent Vacancies in Political Theory/Philosophy

Lecturer in Moral or Political Philosophy, University of Leeds

Assistant Professor in Political Theory, Durham University

Max Weber Post-Doctoral Fellowships (open to political theory/philosophy applications), European University Institute

Conference call: A Post-liberal World?

The Centre for the Study of Global Ethics at Birmingham is pleased to announce its 4th annual conference, on the theme of A Post-liberal World? 

Conference website: globalethics2018.weebly.com

 

  • Where and when: University of Birmingham, 31 May-1 June 2018
  • Already confirmed keynote speakers: Alison Jaggar (Birmingham & Boulder) and Jonathan Wolff (Oxford)
  • Public lecture: Jonathan Wolff will deliver a public lecture on Social Inequality and Structural Injustice (please visit the event page for more info and registration)


Call for Papers: 

The conference will specifically focus on the question whether we are on our way to a post-liberal world. We welcome abstract submissions addressing this theme as well as abstract submissions on a wide range of topics within global ethics.

Abstracts should be 500 words maximum and include three to five keywords. They should be send to globalethicsevents@contacts.bham.ac.uk. The deadline for submissions is 10 February 2018.

For more information on the Call for Papers, please visit the CFP section on the conference website: http://globalethics2018.weebly.com/cfp.html

Conference Call: How should we distribute atypical goods of justice?

Beyond Primary Goods

How should we distribute atypical goods of justice?

The Third Munich Workshop in the Philosophy of Institutions

February 14th – 16th, 2018

International Graduate Student Workshop at the Technical University of Munich/ Bavarian School of Public Policy, Munich, Germany

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From the Vault: Good Reads on Academic Practice

While Justice Everywhere takes a break over the summer, we recall from our archives some of our memorable posts from 2016-2017.

Here are four good reads on matters of academic practice that you may have missed or be interested to re-read:

Mollie Gerver’s ‘Blind Reviewing for Workshops

Bruno Leipold’s ‘6 Tips for Graduate Political Theory Students

Maeve McKeown’s ‘Support for Early Career Researchers, Increase Diversity

Andrew Walton’s ‘Writing a Good Referee Report for a Journal Article

Student Teaching Evaluations

What’s the best way of digesting student teaching evaluations?

This is a difficult question to answer, even for an experienced teacher. Student evaluations can be very helpful and give you a good sense of what is working and what isn’t, and also perhaps what to do about it. But it can be quite upsetting to receive negative feedback especially if it is flippant or personal, as some of it is.

For these reasons, when we received the student evaluations for our first year compulsory political theory module, I emailed my teaching assistants (all PhD students or recent graduates) with some advice.

I am sure there’s lots more good advice I missed out and perhaps there are things that I say here are mistaken. If so I’d be delighted to be further informed about how best to react to feedback and how I might better advise my TAs in particular. But thinking it might have some useful guidance for others, I post a slightly altered version of the email below.

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